MOTH SPECIES

Recognise moth species

Harmless to look at, but not to be underestimated – moths and caterpillars cause considerable damage to textiles and food. Please find out more about their lifestyle here.

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Dried fruit moth

(Plodia interpunctella)

Dried fruit moth

Look

  • The dried fruit moth has a 7 to 9 mm body length and a 15 to 20 mm wingspan. The first third of their forewings are light grey to grey-yellow; the remaining part is copper-red.
  • The larvae are whitish-yellow, reddish or greenish with a brown head. Their colour depends on their food intake.

Reproduction

  • The development of the dried fruit moth takes about 35 days under ideal temperature conditions (> 25 ° C) – at temperatures outside this range. When consuming nutrient-poor food, it develops much more slowly.

Way of life

  • The caterpillars of the dried fruit moth feed on nuts, dried fruit, legumes, chocolate, cocoa and coffee – in exceptional cases and fresh fruit.
  • Dried fruit moths belong to the pests of stored food. They mainly eat and pollute grain products. Infested food must be disposed of. We recommend hermetically sealed containers for storing food.

 

Clothes moth

(Tineola bisselliella)

Clothes moth

Look

  • The clothes moth grows between 6 and 8 mm in size.
  • Their forewings are bright golden brown and without any noticeable markings. The rear wings are strongly frayed (“ciliate”).
  • The larva grows up to 10 mm. It is creamy-white with a golden-brown head. It lives in a silk cocoon that is often 10 to 15 times the length of its body.
  • The doll is about 6 mm tall.

Reproduction

  • The clothes moth development from egg to complete insect usually takes six weeks (nutrient-poor food and cold temperatures: 10 to 18 months).

Way of life

  • The larvae of the clothes moth eat irregular holes in textiles and fabrics.
  • The whole insect does not consume any food. It runs more than it flies and avoids light.

 

Paste moth

(Endrosis sarcitrella)

Paste moth

Look

  • The glue moth reaches a size of 6 to 10 mm when fully grown. Her head and chest are bright white; the forewings are speckled.
  • The larva becomes up to 12 mm long. It is ivory in colour and has a red-brown head.
  • Pupation takes place in a silk cocoon.

Reproduction

  • The paste moth typically trains one generation per year.

Way of life

  • The paste moth is often found in unheated, uninhabited buildings.
  • It is generally considered to be a scavenger.

 

Fur moth

(Tinea pellionella)

Fur moth

Look

  • The fur moth reaches a size of approx—6 mm when fully grown.
  • It has dark sand-coloured fore wings with three pale spots (often looking like two).
  • The larva grows up to 10 mm. She lives in a silk cocoon. This usually has the colour of the textiles that the larva has eaten.
  • The pupa develops in the closed larval envelope.

Reproduction

  • The development of the fur moth from egg to complete insect usually takes six weeks (with nutrient-poor food and cold temperatures: 10 to 18 months).

Way of life

  • The fur moth is less common than the clothes moth.
  • It is mainly found in imported goods such as animal skins and other products of animal origin.
  • Their larvae eat regular holes in textiles and fabrics.

 

Seed moth

(Hofmannophila pseudospretella)

Seed moth

Look

  • The seed moth reaches a size of 8 to 14 mm.
  • Their forewings are dark brown and each with three or four black points.
  • The larva grows up to 20 mm. She is dirty white with a brown head. Your first breast segment is maroon.
  • The doll is 15 to 20 mm tall and is in a silk cocoon.

Reproduction

  • As a rule, there is one generation of seed moth per year.

Way of life

  • The seed moth is found mainly in bird nests and on moist supplies of textiles, leather, and cork.
  • Before pupation, the larvae often cover considerable distances.