TYPES OF MATERIAL PESTS

AAA Termites and Pest Control Lexicon: Detecting material pests

Everyone knows the harm moths cause. But some insects can damage materials of plant or animal origin. Material pests often infect high-value goods – we will show you the damage that an untreated infestation can cause.

Bacon beetle

(Dermestes maculates)

leather-beetle

Look

  • The bacon beetle grows to 6 to 10 mm.
  • Its back is brown or black. The belly is white with a particular pattern. The white colour on the abdomen is more or less developed depending on the type of bacon beetle.
  • The suture tip of the wing covers is drawn out like a thorn.
  • The anal spines are not thickened at the base and taper evenly.
  • The larvae of the bacon beetle are similar to those of the bacon beetle (Dermestes lardarius) but with a light vertical stripe on the back.

Reproduction

  • The development of the bacon beetle takes about 2 to 3 months under temperature conditions of 18 to 25 ° C.
  • The beetle develops preferentially in organic materials such as fur or untanned leather as a typical material pest.

Way of life

  • The bacon beetle feeds on dried meat and fish.
  • It is a shared storage pest.
  • Adult bacon beetles can fly.

Spotted fur beetle

(Attagenus billion)

fur-beetle-Attagenus billion-species

Look

  • The length of the spotted fur beetle is 4 to 6 mm.
  • It has an elongated oval body with a small white spot on each wing. Otherwise, it is red-brown to black.
  • The larvae are 6 mm long, yellow-brown and have a densely hairy body. There is a long, orange-coloured bristle tail on the abdomen. The larvae have a curled appearance.

Reproduction

  • The spotted fur beetle reproduces in the wild.
  • Egg-laying and development then take place in apartments and storage rooms.
  • The female fur beetle lays between 40 and 50 eggs on a suitable food substrate, such as fur, carpets, wool or insulating materials.
  • The development cycle from egg to beetle takes about one year but can extend to 3 years.
  • The spotted fur beetle produces a maximum of one new generation per year.

Way of life

  • The spotted fur beetle is mainly found in the flowers of blackthorn and hawthorn and old wasp, ant or bird nests.
  • The leading food of the larvae is the protein keratin, which is found in hair and wool.
  • The fur beetle mainly damages animal skins, furs and wool products.

Ball beetle

(Gibbium psylloides)

shiny-spider-beetle

Look

  • The size of the ball beetle is 1.5-3 mm.
  • Its elytra are shiny and smooth and brownish to red.
  • The ball beetle has long, jointed antennae.
  • He has a spider-like appearance.

Reproduction

  • The ball beetle lays its eggs in clutches of up to 120 eggs in early summer. The larvae hatch after approx. Sixteen days and remain in the larval stage for approx. 6 weeks.
  • The ball beetle goes through four larval stages and can live up to 12 months.
  • The ideal reproductive temperature for the ball beetle is 33 ° C, which developed into a fully grown beetle is completed after approx. 45 days.
  • The ball beetle feeds on animal and vegetable remains and fruits (mainly grain) and textiles, wool and dead, dried-up insects.

Way of life

  • The ball beetle is relatively insensitive to cold and survives for a long time without eating.
  • He is unable to fly and plays dead as soon as he feels disturbed.
  • The ball beetle is known for its frequent occurrence in large numbers in old buildings and half-timbered houses.

Brass beetle

(Niptus hololeucus)

golden-spider-beetle

Look

  • When fully grown, the brass beetle is 3 to 4.5 mm in size.
  • It is golden yellow and has long, silky hair on its wing covers (elytra) that have grown together.
  • The brass beetle has no wings.

Reproduction

  • The larvae hatch from the eggs of the brass beetle after 11 to 20 days. The larval stage lasts 150 days.
  • Pupation takes place over 18 to 26 days.
  • The whole insect lives up to 250 days.

Way of life

  • The brass beetle and its larvae attack wool, linen and silk when the fibres are soiled with fat.
  • It avoids daylight and is primarily nocturnal.
  • The brass beetle often occurs in half-timbered houses with false floors.

Dust and booklouse

(Liposcelis bostrychophila, Lepinotus patruelis)

booklouse-liposcelis

Look

  • Depending on the species, the dust and booklouse become 1 to 2 mm in size when fully grown.
  • Their body is yellow-brown and dark brown.
  • The nymph is tiny and often appears transparent.
  • There is no larval stage.

Reproduction

  • The species “Liposcelis bostrychophilles” prefers high temperatures between 25 and 30 ° C.
  • “Lepinotus patruelis”, on the other hand, multiplies at 5 to 15 ° C.

Way of life

  • The species “Liposcelis bostrychophilles” spreads mainly in private households.
  • “Lepinotus patruelis” can often be found in factories, on transport pallets, in houses on wood wool, between old paper and in upholstered furniture.

Cabbage flower beetle

(Anthrenus verbasci)

varied-carpet-beetle-species

Look

  • The cabbage flower beetle is 3 mm tall and has the shape of a ladybug.
  • Its elytra are provided with three undulating white crossbars.
  • The larva of the cabbage flower beetle is 4 to 5 mm in size. It is brown and hairy and has two paired tufts of spear-like bristles on the last abdominal segments.
  • The pupa develops in the last larval skin.
  • The pupal stage lasts 10 to 30 days.

Reproduction

  • The woolly flower beetle reproduces in the wild. He often flies into buildings to lay eggs.
  • Usually, there is one generation a year – two in warm temperatures.

Way of life

  • The woolly flower beetle is the most common textile pest. It occurs increasingly in museums and houses – but can also be found in bird nests.
  • The larvae curl up in the event of disturbance or danger.
  • Some people are allergic to the bristles of the larvae.